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What to expect on an Airboat tour..FAQ

I've been asked a lot of questions about our tours and I think we can help many people with this question and answer blog.  If I forget to cover any questions you have, feel free to comment and I will get right back to you. One of the most common questions is, "do we need bug spray?"  Short answer, no.  We haven't had any issues with bugs and because we are off the water before dark, no mosquitoes.  So, you are welcome to spray on the bug spray, but its really not needed. Sunscreen, YES!  Most of our airboats are not covered right now, it's so pretty out and we would like our guests to see everything that is in the water and in the air.  Since it seems like Central Florida sits 3000 miles closer to the sun than the rest of the world, sunscreen is your best friend here!  Us Floridians, when we shower in the mornings, it's not water coming out, its sunscreen! Can you eat on the boats?  Well, as long as you want to share everything your "trying" to eat with the people sitting behind you and the captain, it's not a good idea.  Our boats can get up to 35 mph on the water. Can we take an umbrella on the boat so we can be covered?  Unfortunately, the only thing taking an umbrella will do is turn inside out.  Imagine driving in a car, roll down the window and hold the open umbrella out.  Yep, that's exactly how it is on an airboat. Rain gear?  We offer rain gear in our office ant check in, or you can bring your own.  We do go out in the light rain, but no lightning.  When it rains, we get to see some wildlife become very active.  The fresh water hitting...

Rods, reels, line and baits

When your heading out the door in the morning, you want to make sure you are prepared for what you are going fishing for. For instance,  your not going to take a big 8 foot rod with 100 pound test line to go out bream or speck fishing, that's overkill and you would never feel the fish bite the bait.   So, we're going to talk about some of the basic tackle you will need to head out for a fun day of fishing. Rods, there are so many different types of rods.  We are talking about casting, spinning, fly, trolling, telescopic...

Cotton Mouth……aka….. The Water Moccasin

The Water moccasin is a very venomous snake, in other words, they are poisonous.   Sadly, harmless snakes are often killed out of fear for the safety of family and pets.  But, all snakes bite, so even if they are not venomous it can still hurt.    So, how can you tell if its a Moccasin?  Lets look at some of their features. Water Moccasins have bodies that are very thick and heavy for the length and short thick tails.  Their heads are blocky with a thinner neck.  Adults are very dark, almost black.   A young water moccasin appears brightly colored with red-brown bands that extend across its back and down its sides without crossing the belly, set against a brown body color.   If you look at the snake's head when it's flat on the ground or from above it, you can't see its eyes.  Large, plate like scales cover the top of the head, and pits (holes)  right between the nostril and the eye helps scene heat from other animals for food. Water moccasins are present as three species.  Living across Florida, the Florida Moccasin has a native range that includes the upper Florida Keys and parts of extreme southeastern Georgia.  The eastern moccasin ranges from the Carolinas and Georgia to southeastern Virginia.  The western moccasin has the largest range in that it lives in eastern Texas, Oklahoma, eastern Cherokee County in Kansas, Louisiana, Arkansas, southern Missouri, western Tennessee and even the extreme southern regions of Indiana and Illinois, as well as Mississippi, western Kentucky and Alabama. So, no matter where you are at, always be aware of what is around you.  ...